Read the article entitled ‘The Ontological Argument by St. Anselm.’ It is on Chapter 10 of Archie Lee’s Reading for Philosophical Inquiry: A Brief Introduction to Philosophical Thinking ver. 0.21. Answer the following questions.

1. Explain whether you think St. Anselm believes understanding the nature of religious belief is a necessary condition for believing in the nature and existence of God.

2. As clearly as possible, restate Anselm’s ontological argument.

3. Clearly explain what St. Anselm means when he writes there is only one way God can be conceived not to exist.

4. Explain why, according to St. Anselm, only God and nothing else cannot not exist? According to Anselm, why couldn’t other necessary beings exist?

18 comments:

Mary Lare Alexine M. Rivera said...

Mary Lare Alexine M. Rivera
BSA - 1

Answers:
1. I think St. Anselm I have conceived the belief of religion is to sacrifice the understanding and to create the image of God.
2. Anselm's ontological argument is the insight of God as a being influence of each other and not existing.
3. St. Anselm means when he write is not greater than can be conceived but this is a rise of God in his heart.
4. According to St. Anselm, it can be conceived not to exist since he signify by God. According to Anselm, this which can be other possible of being implies existence.

Anonymous said...

Carbonilla, Charlina Dawn H.
BSBA-1

1. Because Anselm believes reason is necessary to elucidate and validate faith. Anselm is often considered to be the father of scholastic philosophy since his work emphasizes linguistic and analytical thinking. Scholasticism was the dominant approach to philosophical and theological problems during the medieval period.

2.First. let's take a look at this form of argument in general. Suppose you think there is a largest prime number. I can prove that you are wrong by reductio. I assume that there is a largest prime -- call it p. My assumption, however, is merely for the sake of letting it self-destruct. I will show that the assumption is inconsistent. That means it would require one and the same thing to be both true and false.

Let's follow the reasoning. To make it work, we will need a premise that you already know from high school algebra. Every whole number is either prime or else can be written as a product of prime factors. For example: 1078 is not prime. But 1078 = 2x7x7x11, and each of these factors is prime. We will take the prime factor theorem for granted. (If anyone is truly curious, let me know and I'll provide a proof.)

Now back to our reductio. We supposed that there is some largest prime number p. Consider this number:

p! = 1x2x3x4x5x6x...xp

and then add 1 to it:

p! + 1

Is p! + 1 prime? If it is, then it is larger than p, and so we have our absurdity: we assumed p was the largest prime, but we have a larger prime. namely p! + 1. On the other hand, suppose P! + 1 is not prime. Then it has prime factor. Which is the smallest of them?

It can't be 2. (p! + 1)/2 has a remainder of 1. So does (p! + 1)/3, (p! + 1)/4, and all the way up to (p! + !)/p. So the smallest prime factor of (p! + 1) must be larger that p itself. The assumption that p is the largest prime number leads to the conclusion that p isn't the largest prime number.

3. Anselm defines God by saying God is that “which nothing greater can be conceived.” One way to interpret this phrase is to define “God” as maximal perfection, i.e. the greatest possible being (and this is the definition that the ontological argument will use here). Some may criticize this definition by saying that’s not what they mean when they use the term God. But that really doesn’t matter. If the argument proves that such a being exists, then it does so regardless of what one wishes to call the being of maximal perfection. Furthermore, it’s unclear why a rational person should be reluctant to call such a being God, or why God wouldn’t be the greatest possible being.

Jehdama Teja said...

ANSWER:

1. Yes, St. Anselm's believes understanding the nature of religious belief is a necessary condition for believing in the nature and existence of God. Truly there is a God, although the fool has said in his heart, There is no God.Therefore, if that, than which nothing greater can be conceived, exists in the understanding alone, the very being, than which nothing greater can be conceived, is one, than which a greater can be conceived. But obviously this is impossible. Hence, there is doubt that there exists a being, than which nothing greater can be conceived, and it exists both in the understanding and in reality.
2. Anselm's antological belief states that we must believe that there is a Supreme Creator who made the heaven and earth including human eventhough we can't see him visibly in our naked eyes. We must believe that God exists even we can't conceive him. It is in the person's own faith in his heart whether he believes that there is God.
3. In the former sense, then, God can be conceived not to exist; but in the latter, not at all. For no one who understands what fire and water are can conceive fire to be water, in accordance with the nature of the facts themselves, although this is possible according to the words. So, then, no one who understands what God is can conceive that God does not exist; although he says these words in his heart, either without any or with some foreign, signification. For, God is that than which a greater cannot be conceived. And he who thoroughly understands this, assuredly understands that this being so truly exists, that not even in concept can it be non-existent. Therefore, he who understands that God so exists, cannot conceive that he does not exist.
4. According to St. Anselm, only God and nothing else cannot not exist because He is the Supreme Creator of all and that a person must believe that there is One Creator who made the heaven and earth.

SUBMITTED BY:
Jehdama Teja
BSBA

Anonymous said...

LAILA R. REMOT
5110073
“The Ontological Argument” by St. Anselm
1.)Explain whether you think St. Anselm believes understanding the nature of religious belief is a necessary condition for believing in the nature and existence of God.
An Augustinian tradition states that seeking to believe in order to understand in the truth and existence of God, and St. Anselm extended that into, seeking to understand in order to believe the truth and existence of God. So I think St. Anselm believe that understanding is a necessary condition for believing. Because he suggested that if we understand this concept, and understanding itself caused the being to exist in the mind therefore understanding makes us believe that God exist.
2.)As clear as possible, restate Anselm’s ontological argument.
Anselm defined God as the greatest possible being we can conceive and argued that this being could exist in the mind. He suggested that, if the greatest possible being exists in the mind, it must also exist in reality. If it only exists in the mind, a greater being is possible, one which exists in the mind and in reality. But we cannot be imagining something greater than God because we believe that He is a being in which nothing greater can be conceived. Therefore, God exist. Simply stating, that if you understand that God is the greatest being exist eternally, then you believe that He exist.
3.)Clearly explain what St. Anselm means when he writes there is only one way God can be conceived not to exist.
He means that the only way God can be conceived not to exist is when you develop it in your mind. If you take the non-existence of God in your mind, then you believe that He does not exist. And he said that, beings that can be conceived not to exist is not God.
4.)Explain why, according to St. Anselm, only God and nothing else cannot not exist? According to Anselm, why couldn’t other necessary beings exist?
Only God and nothing else cannot not exist. It means that only God exist eternally because according to Anselm, he understand that God is the greatest possible being exist wherein no other being exist greater than Him.
According to Anselm, other necessary being couldn’t exist because if a mind could think or conceived a better person than God, then the creature would rise above the Creator, and this is most absurd. It means that other person exist above God is the most unreasonable event. Because, he understand that only God exist eternally and he cannot conceived not to exist.

Anonymous said...

LAILA R. REMOT
5110073
“The Ontological Argument” by St. Anselm
1.)Explain whether you think St. Anselm believes understanding the nature of religious belief is a necessary condition for believing in the nature and existence of God.
An Augustinian tradition states that seeking to believe in order to understand in the truth and existence of God, and St. Anselm extended that into, seeking to understand in order to believe the truth and existence of God. So I think St. Anselm believe that understanding is a necessary condition for believing. Because he suggested that if we understand this concept, and understanding itself caused the being to exist in the mind therefore understanding makes us believe that God exist.
2.)As clear as possible, restate Anselm’s ontological argument.
Anselm defined God as the greatest possible being we can conceive and argued that this being could exist in the mind. He suggested that, if the greatest possible being exists in the mind, it must also exist in reality. If it only exists in the mind, a greater being is possible, one which exists in the mind and in reality. But we cannot be imagining something greater than God because we believe that He is a being in which nothing greater can be conceived. Therefore, God exist. Simply stating, that if you understand that God is the greatest being exist eternally, then you believe that He exist.
3.)Clearly explain what St. Anselm means when he writes there is only one way God can be conceived not to exist.
He means that the only way God can be conceived not to exist is when you develop it in your mind. If you take the non-existence of God in your mind, then you believe that He does not exist. And he said that, beings that can be conceived not to exist is not God.
4.)Explain why, according to St. Anselm, only God and nothing else cannot not exist? According to Anselm, why couldn’t other necessary beings exist?
Only God and nothing else cannot not exist. It means that only God exist eternally because according to Anselm, he understand that God is the greatest possible being exist wherein no other being exist greater than Him.
According to Anselm, other necessary being couldn’t exist because if a mind could think or conceived a better person than God, then the creature would rise above the Creator, and this is most absurd. It means that other person exist above God is the most unreasonable event. Because, he understand that only God exist eternally and he cannot conceived not to exist.

Anonymous said...

1.St. Anselm does not distinguish clearly between religious and philosophical pursuits. Many theologians avoid trusting reason from the fear of the specter of skepticism; however, Anselm believes reason is necessary to elucidate and validate faith. Anselm is often considered to be the father of scholastic philosophy since his work emphasizes linguistic and analytical thinking. Scholasticism was the dominant approach to philosophical and theological problems during the medieval period.

2. The heart of his argument is the insight that if God is defined as a "being than which no greater can be conceived," then God could not be conceived of as not existing because perfection, he thinks, implies existence.

Gomez , Estelita G. BSBA-1st

Anonymous said...

Ann Mel Rose D. Espartero
BSA-1

1. St. Anselm believes understanding the nature of religious belief is a necessary condition for believing in the nature and existence of God. St Anselm believes that God can exist and also can conceive. He believes in the nature of religious because he believes that God exist.

2. St. Anselm is the author of Ontological Argument wherein he wrote about the existence of God, but he also believe that if one thing can conceive it must also be exist in reality, but he believe in God that we all know that God never be seen in real life but it will conceive in our mind only. He believe that God is a being than which nothing greater can be conceive, or there is no such nature, since the fool has said in his heart there is no God. But he believe that can exist.

3. St. Anselm said “there is only one way God can be conceive not to exist “ as simple as that god can exist not to conceive or in a simple word “ we can imagine God in our mind but you never be seen in a reality “

4. “only God and nothing else cannot exist?, there is no more powerful than God, because all things that can conceive must be exist but only God can conceive but not to exist. According to St. Anselm, why couldn’t other necessary beings exist? , because it is a thing that made of God and only God cannot exist.

Anonymous said...

5110143
TAMAGOS, SARAH A.
BSBA1

1. Explain whether you think St. Anselm believes understanding the nature of religious belief is a necessary condition for believing in the nature and existence of God.
*St. Anselm believes that God exists. And he said in his argument there exists, both in the understanding and in reality, something than which a greater cannot be thought.

2. As clearly as possible, restate Anselm’s ontological argument.
*Anslem's argument follow upon this description of God's nature; while separate, both clearly support and rely upon each other for their common argument. In the first stage of his argument, Anselm addresses the difference between the two forms of existence: mind and reality. If the most perfect conceivable being existed only in the mind, a clear contradiction would be established since it is obviously possible to conceive of a still more perfect being--essentially, this would be the same being which was originally understood as existing only in the mind, but now it is understood as also existing in reality. However, here he is not interested in merely the existence of God, but in the sheer necessity of God's existence. This necessity is rooted in the self-existence of God, which leads Anselm to the notion that a lack of existence is impossible for God. Since God is a being of such perfection that none more perfect can be conceived, God can never be understood as having come into existence, nor can God be thought of as ceasing to exist. To entertain such thoughts would make God contingent upon something beyond the divinity, and this is ruled out by God's nature as a being of self-existence--or, more literally, as a being dependent on none other than itself for existence.

3. Clearly explain what St. Anselm means when he writes there is only one way God can be conceived not to exist.
* Anselm said that God cannot be conceived in any way other than "a being than which nothing greater can be conceived." Even the fool knows what he means by "God" when he asserts, "There is no God”. But if the most perfect being existed only in thought and not in reality, then it would not really be the most perfect being, for the one that existed in reality would be more perfect. Therefore, concludes Anselm, "no one who understands what God is, can conceive that God does not exist." In short, it would be self contradictory to say, "I can think of a perfect being that doesn't exist," because existence would have to be a part of perfection. One would be saying, "I can conceive of something greater than that which nothing greater can be conceived", which is absurd.
4. Explain why, according to St. Anselm, only God and nothing else cannot not exist? According to Anselm, why couldn’t other necessary beings exist?
* Among the many intriguing peculiarities of the original argument in Anselm is the fact that this argument for God’s existence turns up in a work that is, not an impersonal treatise on metaphysics, or theology, but rather in a sort of philosophical prayer, an “allocution,” or address, to God! It is surely paradoxical to be addressing a being whose existence one is trying to establish. It is especially paradoxical to be offering the proof as part of a petitioner prayer to that very being. There is, to be sure, no formal contradiction is saying to someone (or as if to someone), “I hereby offer a proof that you exist,” or even, “Help me construct a proof that you exist.” But such a procedure is extraordinarily odd. Indeed, the sincerity of one’s address to God seems to be undermined by the project of offering a proof of God’s existence, just as the sincerity of one’s truly needing or wanting a proof seems to undermine the genuineness of the prayer. Nor does paradox or perplexity end there. Why should God, if He does exist, even be interested in one’s proof that He exists.

Anonymous said...

Ann Mel Rose D. Espartero
BSA-1

1. St. Anselm believes understanding the nature of religious belief is a necessary condition for believing in the nature and existence of God. St Anselm believes that God can exist and also can conceive. He believes in the nature of religious because he believes that God exist.

2. St. Anselm is the author of Ontological Argument wherein he wrote about the existence of God, but he also believe that if one thing can conceive it must also be exist in reality, but he believe in God that we all know that God never be seen in real life but it will conceive in our mind only. He believe that God is a being than which nothing greater can be conceive, or there is no such nature, since the fool has said in his heart there is no God. But he believe that can exist.

3. St. Anselm said “there is only one way God can be conceive not to exist “ as simple as that god can exist not to conceive or in a simple word “ we can imagine God in our mind but you never be seen in a reality “

4. “Only God and nothing else cannot exist?, there is no more powerful than God, because all things that can conceive must be exist but only God can conceive but not to exist. According to St. Anselm, why couldn’t other necessary beings exist? , because it is a thing that made of God and only God cannot exist.

Anonymous said...

Potencio Glenda S.
5110100
BSBA

1. An ontological argument for the existence of God (or simply ontological argument) is any one of a category of arguments for the existence of God. The exact criteria for the classification of ontological arguments are not widely agreed, but the arguments typically start with the definition of God and conclude with his necessary existence, using mostly or only a priori reasoning and little reference to empirical observation.
2. St. Anselm (1033-1109), a member of the Benedictine Order and Bishop of Canterbury, extended the Augustine tradition of seeking to believe in order to understand the truth and existence of God rather that seeking to understand in order to believe in the truth and existence of God. Even so, St. Anselm does not distinguish clearly between religious and philosophical pursuits. Many theologians avoid trusting reason from the fear of the specter of skepticism; however, Anselm believes reason is necessary to elucidate and validate faith. Anselm is often considered to be the father of scholastic philosophy since his work emphasizes linguistic and analytical thinking. Scholasticism was the dominant approach to philosophical and theological problems during the medieval period.
3. Anselm defines God by saying God is that “which nothing greater can be conceived.” One way to interpret this phrase is to define “God” as maximal perfection, i.e. the greatest possible being (and this is the definition that the ontological argument will use here). Some may criticize this definition by saying that’s not what they mean when they use the term God. But that really doesn’t matter. If the argument proves that such a being exists, then it does so regardless of what one wishes to call the being of maximal perfection. Furthermore, it’s unclear why a rational person should be reluctant to call such a being God, or why God wouldn’t be the greatest possible being.
4. St. Anselm’s Ontological Argument is certainly one of the most audacious arguments in the
history of Western philosophy; it may even be the most audacious. It is also one of the most perplexing.
Some philosophers have scorned it. St. Thomas Aquinas did. Others have thought they had refuted it.
Immanuel Kant thought he had done that. Many philosophers have tried to ignore it. But it is difficult for
a serious philosopher to ignore the claims of such a daringly elegant bit of reasoning.
Many philosophers have developed their own version of Anselm’s argument. Some of these
versions are quite crude, others are very sophisticated. In the 17
th
Century every self-respecting
rationalist philosopher, including Descartes, Malebranche, Leibniz, and Spinoza, promoted some version
or other of the argument. In the three subsequent centuries the argument suffered periods of almost
complete neglect. But after each period of neglect, the argument has always been re-discovered, redefended, and re-criticized.

Anonymous said...

ZAIDAN PAGKALIWAGAN
BSA-1

1)in my opinion, St. Anselm believes that the nature of religious belief is a necessary condition for believing in the nature and existence of God. I think, people believe in the existence of God based on the religious belief of their family or either on their culture. Although they do not really see God, their faith never fades that God exists. Just like us, we believe that God exists because of our culture is a religious believer that God is the only creator of this world and he created us as a human.

2)Our understanding of God is a being than which no greater can be conceived.
The idea of God exists in the mind.
A being which exists both in the mind and in reality is greater than a being that exists only in the mind.
If God only exists in the mind, then we can conceive of a greater being—that which exists in reality.
We cannot be imagining something that is greater than God.
Therefore, God exists.
3.Anselm defined God as the greatest possible being we can conceive and argued that this being could exist in the mind. He suggested that, if the greatest possible being exists in the mind, it must also exist in reality.
4. God can only exist because he is perfect, he is the one who implies existence. Other necessary beings couldn't exist because they are only the absence of God,just like evil in the human's heart.

Anonymous said...

ROVILYN DALAPAG
BSA-1

1) The exact criteria for the classification of ontological arguments are not widely agreed, but the arguments typically start with the definition of God and conclude with his necessary existence, using mostly or only a priori reasoning and little reference to empirical observation.

2)A being which exists both in the mind and in reality is greater than a being that exists only in the mind.
If God only exists in the mind, then we can conceive of a greater being—that which exists in reality.
We cannot be imagining something that is greater than God.

3)If it only exists in the mind, a greater being is possible—one which exists in the mind and in reality. Seventeenth century French philosopher René Descartes deployed a similar argument. Descartes published several variations of his argument, each of which centered on the idea that God's existence is immediately inferable from any "clear and distinct" idea of a supremely perfect being.

4)God is usually conceived of as an unlimited being. He is conceived of as a being who could not be limited, that is, as an absolutely unlimited being.… If God is conceived to be an absolutely unlimited being He must be conceived to be unlimited in regard to His existence as well as His operation

Anonymous said...

SARAH MAE BRUZUELA
BSBA-1
5110034



1) The exact criteria for the classification of ontological arguments are not widely agreed, but the arguments typically start with the definition of God and conclude with his necessary existence, using mostly or only a priori reasoning and little reference to empirical observation.

2)A being which exists both in the mind and in reality is greater than a being that exists only in the mind.
If God only exists in the mind, then we can conceive of a greater being—that which exists in reality.
We cannot be imagining something that is greater than God.

3)If it only exists in the mind, a greater being is possible—one which exists in the mind and in reality. Seventeenth century French philosopher René Descartes deployed a similar argument. Descartes published several variations of his argument, each of which centered on the idea that God's existence is immediately inferable from any "clear and distinct" idea of a supremely perfect being.

4)God is usually conceived of as an unlimited being. He is conceived of as a being who could not be limited, that is, as an absolutely unlimited being.… If God is conceived to be an absolutely unlimited being He must be conceived to be unlimited in regard to His existence as well as His operation

Anonymous said...

RICHELLE F. CAMMAGAY
BSBA-1

1.For me,ST.ANSELM believes in understanding the nature of religous belief is a necessary condition because we,our people even though we can't see God our faith to him never fade.And God created us,he loves us so much although sometimes we forget that there;s a God because of temptation.
2. Ontological argument was proposed by Anselm of Canterbury. Anselm defined God as the greatest possible being we can conceive and argued that this being could exist in the mind. He suggested that, if the greatest possible being exists in the mind, it must also exist in reality. If it only exists in the mind, a greater being is possible—one which exists in the mind and in reality. Seventeenth century French philosopher René Descartes deployed a similar argument.
3. Anselm’s argument rests upon the conception of God as “that than which no greater can be conceived”. It is this conception of God with which the hypothesis that God does not exist is supposed to conflict.If God is that than which no greater can be conceived, Anselm argues, then nothing can be imagined that is greater than God. If God does not exist, though, then something can be imagined that is greater than God, namely a God that does exist.
4.It is evident to me that God cannot be all-powerful and all-good at the same time as long as there is evil in the world.If God could be made greater by slightly altering a divine characteristic or two, then there could not be a being than which none greater is possible. However, the most convincing reason for thinking that God might be an impossible being is that the concept of necessary existence may be incoherent.

Anonymous said...

Ronnel A. Mindanao
(BSBA)


1. I think St. Anselm believe in order to understand the truth and existence of God rather that seeking to understand in order to believe in the truth and existence of God. Beacause the heart of his argument is the insight that if God is defined as a “being than which no greater can be conceived”.


2. St. Anselm ontological argument does not distinguish clearly between religious and philosophical pursuits. Anselm is often considered to be the father of scholastic philosophy since his work emphasizes linguistic and analytical thinking. Anselm presents the argument as clarification Christian faith. Baruch Spinoza and René Descartes employed versions of the ontological argument where the very concept of God as a perfect being implies existence as a property. In philosophical jargon, a feature of the essence of God is said to be existence.


3. God does not exist because the concept of God is incoherent or confused. If God is omniscient, He must know beforehand exactly what a person will do in a given situation. In that case, a person is not in fact free to do the alternative to what God knows he or she will do, and free will must be an illusion.


4. God's existence was to some extent obvious for medieval theologians. They simply knew he existed. Nevertheless, they attempted to prove his existence anyway, and the basic strategies employed by them are the ones used every since.

Cheryn Mariz Natividad said...

1. Anselm’s suggested that there’s a greater being that we can convey or argue it must also in the mind and reality. Anselm’s believes in the existence of God so it means that he also believes and understands the nature of religious.
2. Anselm’s ontological arguments:

1. God is that than w/c no greater can be conceived
2. If god is that than w/ no greater can be conceived then there is nothing greater than god that can be imagined
3. There is nothing greater than god that can be imagined.
4. If god does not exist then there is something greater than god that can be imagined
5. There fore
God exist.
3. Anselm presented the notion of a being that cannot be conceived to not exist. He argued that if something can be conceived to not exist, then something greater can be conceived. Consequently, a thing than which nothing greater can be conceived cannot be conceived to not exist and so it must exist
4. Anselm defined God as a "being than which no greater can be conceived".[4] He suggested that even "the fool" can understand this concept, and this understanding itself causes the being to exist in the mind. The concept must exist either only in our mind, or in both our mind and in reality. If such a being exists only in our mind, then a greater being—that which exists in the mind and in reality—can be conceived. Therefore, if we can conceive of a being than which nothing greater can be conceived, it must exist in reality. Thus, a being than which nothing greater could be conceived, which Anselm defined as God, must exist in reality.

Anonymous said...

CONDE,ANNA LUZ DAYNE

1. An ontological argument for the existence of god is any one of a category of arguments for the existence of god. Anselm suggested that if the greatest possible being exists in the mind, it must also exist in reality. He concluded that god really exists, so if he believes in the existence of god then, he also believe and understand the nature of religious belief as a necessary condition.
2. Anselm’s arguments can be summarized as:
1. Our understanding of god is a being than which no greater can be conceived.
2. The idea of god exists in the mind
3. There is nothing greater than god that can be imagined
4. If god does not exist then there is something greater than god that can be imagined.
5. We cannot imagine something that is greater than god.
6. There for god exists
3. Anselm’s defined god as the greatest possible being we can conceive and argued that this being could exist in the mind. He suggested that if the greatest possible being exists in the mind, it must also exist in reality. If it only exist in the mind, a greater being is possible –one which exists in the mind and reality.
4. Anselm presented the notion of a being that cannot be conceived to not exist. He argued that if something can be conceived to not exist ,then something greater can be conceived .Consequently ,a thing than which nothing greater can be conceived to not exist and so it must exist

Anonymous said...

NATIVIDAD,CHERYN MARIZ



1. Anselm’s suggested that there’s a greater being that we can convey or argue it must also in the mind and reality. Anselm’s believes in the existence of God so it means that he also believes and understands the nature of religious.
2. Anselm’s ontological arguments:
1. God is that than w/c no greater can be conceived
2. If god is that than w/ no greater can be conceived then there is nothing greater than god that can be imagined
3. There is nothing greater than god that can be imagined.
4. If god does not exist then there is something greater than god that can be imagined
5. There fore
God exist.
3. Anselm presented the notion of a being that cannot be conceived to not exist. He argued that if something can be conceived to not exist, then something greater can be conceived. Consequently, a thing than which nothing greater can be conceived cannot be conceived to not exist and so it must exist
4. Anselm defined God as a "being than which no greater can be conceived".[4] He suggested that even "the fool" can understand this concept, and this understanding itself causes the being to exist in the mind. The concept must exist either only in our mind, or in both our mind and in reality. If such a being exists only in our mind, then a greater being—that which exists in the mind and in reality—can be conceived. Therefore, if we can conceive of a being than which nothing greater can be conceived, it must exist in reality. Thus, a being than which nothing greater could be conceived, which Anselm defined as God, must exist in reality.

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